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3/16/2017 by mdc
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesconca/2017/03/16/nuscales-small-modular-nuc...
Dr. Conca reports that NuScale Power is a company with a mission, to build the first small modular nuclear reactor in America. As of now, they are certainly on track. In January, NuScale submitted the first design certification application for any SMR in the U.S. to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

This week, NRC has accepted their design certification application, light speed for our nuclear bureaucracy. By accepting the DCA for review, the NRC staff confirms that NuScales submission addresses all of the NRC requirements and contains sufficient technical information to conduct a full review.

It seems NuScale has all its ducks in a row, absolutely critical for as fast a review and licensing as possible. Those ducks included about 12,000 pages of technical information from over 800 NuScale staff and about 40,000 NRC staff-hours in pre-application discussions and interactions.

Even so, the review will take most of 40 months, after which NRC will issue a design certification that will be valid for 15 years for NuScale to construct this new type of power plant. The first commercial NuScale power plant is planned for construction on the site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS) and operated by experienced nuclear operator Energy Northwest.

NuScale CEO John Hopkins, said that there is a real need to upgrade American infrastructure to provide for clean and reliable electricity to spur growth in the U.S. There is a real need to boost American manufacturing, and create American jobs. This is no small goal. Conservative estimates predict between 55 and 75 GW of electricity will come from operating SMRs around the world by 2035, the equivalent of more than 1,000 NuScale Power Modules. And the U.S. should lead that effort, until, that is, knock-offs become super cheap. Sound familiar?

Good read ...

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